Legislature(2019 - 2020)BUTROVICH 205

03/06/2020 03:30 PM RESOURCES

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Audio Topic
03:29:36 PM Start
03:30:26 PM SB176
05:02:54 PM Adjourn
* first hearing in first committee of referral
+ teleconferenced
= bill was previously heard/scheduled
*+ SB 176 REGULATE PFAS USE; FIRE/WATER SAFETY TELECONFERENCED
Heard & Held
-- Public Testimony --
*+ SB 232 PERSONAL USE FISHING PERMIT FEES TELECONFERENCED
Scheduled but Not Heard
-- Public Testimony --
+ Bills Previously Heard/Scheduled TELECONFERENCED
                    ALASKA STATE LEGISLATURE                                                                                  
              SENATE RESOURCES STANDING COMMITTEE                                                                             
                         March 6, 2020                                                                                          
                           3:29 p.m.                                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
MEMBERS PRESENT                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                
Senator Peter Micciche, Chair                                                                                                   
Senator John Coghill, Vice Chair                                                                                                
Senator Click Bishop                                                                                                            
Senator Cathy Giessel                                                                                                           
Senator Scott Kawasaki                                                                                                          
Senator Jesse Kiehl                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                
MEMBERS ABSENT                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
Senator Joshua Revak                                                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
COMMITTEE CALENDAR                                                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
SENATE BILL NO. 176                                                                                                             
"An Act  relating to pollutants;  relating to  perfluoroalkyl and                                                               
polyfluoroalkyl  substances;  relating  to   the  duties  of  the                                                               
Department  of   Environmental  Conservation;  and   relating  to                                                               
firefighting substances."                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                
     - HEARD & HELD                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                
SENATE BILL NO. 232                                                                                                             
"An Act relating to personal use fishing permits."                                                                              
                                                                                                                                
     - SCHEDULED BUT NOT HEARD                                                                                                  
                                                                                                                                
PREVIOUS COMMITTEE ACTION                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                
BILL: SB 176                                                                                                                  
SHORT TITLE: REGULATE PFAS USE; FIRE/WATER SAFETY                                                                               
SPONSOR(s): SENATOR(s) KIEHL                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                
02/05/20       (S)       READ THE FIRST TIME - REFERRALS                                                                        
02/05/20       (S)       RES, FIN                                                                                               
03/06/20       (S)       RES AT 3:30 PM BUTROVICH 205                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
WITNESS REGISTER                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                
CALVIN ZUELOW, Intern                                                                                                           
Senator Jesse Kiehl                                                                                                             
Alaska State Legislature                                                                                                        
Juneau, Alaska                                                                                                                  
POSITION STATEMENT: Provided a sectional analysis for SB 176.                                                                 
                                                                                                                                
JOHN BINDER, Deputy Commissioner                                                                                                
Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities                                                                       
Anchorage, Alaska                                                                                                               
POSITION STATEMENT: Answered questions regarding SB 176.                                                                      
                                                                                                                                
DENISE KOCH, Director                                                                                                           
Division of Spill Prevention and Response                                                                                       
Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation                                                                                 
Juneau, Alaska                                                                                                                  
POSITION STATEMENT: Answered questions regarding SB 176.                                                                      
                                                                                                                                
KELLY MCLAUGHLIN, representing self                                                                                             
Gustavus, Alaska                                                                                                                
POSITION STATEMENT: Testified in support of SB 176.                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
MELANIE LESH, representing self                                                                                                 
Gustavus, Alaska                                                                                                                
POSITION STATEMENT: Testified in support of SB 176.                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
JON ERICKSON, Manager                                                                                                           
City and Borough of Yakutat                                                                                                     
Yakutat, Alaska                                                                                                                 
POSITION STATEMENT: Testified in support of SB 176.                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
PAMELA MILLER, Executive Director                                                                                               
Alaska Community Action on Toxics                                                                                               
Anchorage, Alaska                                                                                                               
POSITION STATEMENT: Testified in support of SB 176.                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
DAVID BERREY, member                                                                                                            
Wake Up Alaskans to the Toxic Reality                                                                                           
Fairbanks, Alaska                                                                                                               
POSITION STATEMENT: Testified in support of SB 176.                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
SALLY SCHLICHTING, representing self                                                                                            
Juneau, Alaska                                                                                                                  
POSITION STATEMENT: Testified in support of SB 176.                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
BROOKE IVY, External Affairs Manager                                                                                            
Alaska Oil and Gas Association                                                                                                  
Anchorage, Alaska                                                                                                               
POSITION STATEMENT: Testified in opposition of SB 176.                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
PATRICE LEE, member                                                                                                             
Citizens for Clean Air                                                                                                          
Fairbanks, Alaska                                                                                                               
POSITION STATEMENT: Testified in support of SB 176.                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
PAUL LIEDBERG, representing self                                                                                                
Dillingham, Alaska                                                                                                              
POSITION STATEMENT: Testified in support of SB 176.                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
JIM WILLIAMS, Chief of Staff                                                                                                    
Administration Center                                                                                                           
Fairbanks North Star Borough                                                                                                    
Fairbanks, Alaska                                                                                                               
POSITION STATEMENT: Testified in support of SB 176.                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
ACTION NARRATIVE                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                
3:29:36 PM                                                                                                                    
CHAIR  PETER  MICCICHE  called   the  Senate  Resources  Standing                                                             
Committee meeting  to order at 3:29  p.m. Present at the  call to                                                               
order were  Senators Kiehl,  Coghill, Bishop,  Giessel, Kawasaki,                                                               
and Chair Micciche.                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                
          SB 176-REGULATE PFAS USE; FIRE/WATER SAFETY                                                                       
                                                                                                                                
3:30:26 PM                                                                                                                    
CHAIR MICCICHE announced  that the first order  of business would                                                               
be SENATE BILL NO. 176,  "An Act relating to pollutants; relating                                                               
to  perfluoroalkyl and  polyfluoroalkyl  substances; relating  to                                                               
the duties  of the Department of  Environmental Conservation; and                                                               
relating to firefighting substances."                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
3:30:45 PM                                                                                                                    
SENATOR JESSE  KIEHL, Alaska  State Legislature,  Juneau, Alaska,                                                               
speaking as sponsor,  explained that SB 176 addresses  a group of                                                               
chemicals  collectively known  as PFAS,  a catchall  for multiple                                                               
chemicals used  in Alaska for  firefighting. The  greatest source                                                               
of PFAS chemicals sprayed into  the environment from firefighting                                                               
is aqueous film forming foams (AFFF).                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
He  said AFFF  is extremely  good at  fighting fires,  especially                                                               
when  hydrocarbons like  oil  are burning.  However,  it is  also                                                               
really bad  for human  beings. The science  on AFFF  continues to                                                               
evolve,  but a  great  deal is  known on  its  toxicity. AFFF  is                                                               
persistent  in   the  body  and   extremely  persistent   in  the                                                               
environment. It  crosses the placental  barrier when  ingested by                                                               
pregnant women  and causes  low birth  weight, among  other fetal                                                               
deformities. The  AFFF list of  impacts on human beings  goes on,                                                               
but the list does include cancer and thyroid issues.                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
He  detailed   that  the   Alaska  Department   of  Environmental                                                               
Conservation (DEC)  listed PFAS chemicals as  hazardous materials                                                               
some  time ago.  In  2018, there  was an  effort  to set  cleanup                                                               
levels for  when these chemicals were  in the water. In  the end,                                                               
Alaska's  scientific  experts  deferred   to  the  United  States                                                               
Environmental  Protection   Agency  (EPA)   on  what   the  water                                                               
standards should be.  Deferring to the federal  government is not                                                               
a long  and proud  part of  Alaska's tradition and  SB 176  is an                                                               
effort  for the  legislature  to step  up  and protect  Alaskans'                                                               
health, especially when it comes to the state's drinking water.                                                                 
                                                                                                                                
3:33:31 PM                                                                                                                    
SENATOR KIEHL  explained that SB  176 lists seven  PFAS chemicals                                                               
with  the best  and  clearest  science. The  bill  sets good  and                                                               
protective standards based  on a working group from  the State of                                                               
Michigan that  looked extensively at peer  reviewed and published                                                               
information. The  bill sets  standards specifically  for drinking                                                               
water and  not for site  cleanup. It focuses on  Alaskans' health                                                               
and the water they drink.                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                
He  noted that  his  office worked  extensively with  Legislative                                                               
Legal  Services to  keep the  current  polluter-pays paradigm  in                                                               
statute for  oil and hazardous  materials. PFAS chemicals  are in                                                               
drinking  water  and  dealt  with   under  the  State's  oil  and                                                               
hazardous materials law  and that provision is  maintained in the                                                               
bill.                                                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  KIEHL explained  that SB  176 also  stipulates that  DEC                                                               
will ensure  that the  polluter pays  for alternative  sources of                                                               
drinking water when water  contamination exceeds levels specified                                                               
in the bill. Alternative water  sources include providing bottled                                                               
water,  filtration,  and extending  a  municipal  water system  -                                                               
whatever makes the most sense.                                                                                                  
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  KIEHL  said the  bill  would  provide blood  testing  to                                                               
determine pollutant levels  for both someone who  drank the water                                                               
and for  a first responder  who had  to spray the  PFAS materials                                                               
while  performing  their  duties.   PFAS  exposure  affects  many                                                               
Alaskan firefighters.                                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR KIEHL  pointed out that SB  176 would also put  a stop to                                                               
spraying more PFAS into Alaska's  environment. After a great deal                                                               
of conversation  with the  state fire  marshal, an  exception was                                                               
inserted for  the oil  and gas industry.  The state  fire marshal                                                               
believes  very strongly  that for  large oil  fires, such  as the                                                               
terminal  at Valdez  or the  Trans-Alaska Pipeline  System, there                                                               
currently are  not alternative  chemicals that  would do  the job                                                               
adequately.  SB  176  is  about  protecting  public  health,  but                                                               
maintaining public  safety is important as  well. The prohibition                                                               
on spraying  PFAS for non-exempted  firefighting takes  effect in                                                               
October 2021  when the Federal  Aviation Administration  (FAA) no                                                               
longer requires airports to use PFAS.                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
3:36:28 PM                                                                                                                    
SENATOR KIEHL noted that SB 176  requires the DEC to accept up to                                                               
25  gallons  of PFAS  concentrate  for  disposal. The  relatively                                                               
small  quantities   allow  DEC   to  properly  dispose   of  PFAS                                                               
concentrate  without pushing  the cost  down on  communities that                                                               
don't have the resources to deal with it.                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                
He said  there are two  proposed amendments for the  committee to                                                               
consider. The  first expands the  exemption list for PFAS  use to                                                               
those required  by federal law.  The exemption includes  the U.S.                                                               
Coast  Guard as  well as  oil and  gas transporters.  Fire chiefs                                                               
pointed out  that the scale and  scope of tank truck  fires would                                                               
require PFAS use.                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR KIEHL  detailed that the  second amendment  addresses the                                                               
responsibility  for providing  the clean  drinking water  and the                                                               
blood testing  when a fire  department does its duty.  Whoever is                                                               
responsible for the underlying fire  would be responsible for the                                                               
drinking  water provisions  in the  bill. For  example, the  fire                                                               
department's  duty does  not include  dealing  with the  unburned                                                               
hydrocarbon  that  has been  extinguished,  it's  the fuel  truck                                                               
owner's  responsibility.  That fuel  truck  owner  would also  be                                                               
responsible if  the PFAS sprayed  on the fire got  into someone's                                                               
drinking water.                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                
3:39:04 PM                                                                                                                    
SENATOR KIEHL  summarized that the  bill is about  clean drinking                                                               
water  for  Alaskans, protecting  health  and  safety, and  using                                                               
existing oil and hazardous substance cleanup provisions.                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR GIESSEL  noted that the  bill cites standards based  on a                                                               
working group  from Michigan.  She asked  if the  information was                                                               
from the contaminant  that affected the drinking  water in Flint,                                                               
Michigan.                                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR KIEHL answered that he did not believe so. He surmised                                                                  
that the primary issue in Flint, Michigan was lead in piping                                                                    
systems.                                                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
CHAIR MICCICHE asked for a sectional analysis on SB 176.                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
3:40:07 PM                                                                                                                    
CALVIN ZUELOW, Intern, Senator Kiehl, Alaska State Legislature,                                                                 
Juneau, Alaska, detailed that section 1 of SB 176 creates three                                                                 
new sections in AS 46.03 as follows:                                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
        1. AS 46.03.340:                                                                                                        
             • AS 46.03.340(a): Directs the Department of                                                                       
               Environmental  Conservation to  test drinking                                                                    
               water   near   PFAS  spills.   Requires   the                                                                    
               department   to   make   sure   anyone   with                                                                    
               contaminated   drinking   water  gets   clean                                                                    
               drinking  water  and  up to  three  years  of                                                                    
               voluntary blood testing for PFAS levels.                                                                         
             • AS 46.03.340(b): Sets health-based maximum                                                                       
               levels  of  contamination in  drinking  water                                                                    
               for seven PFAS  chemicals and maintains DEC's                                                                    
               authority to set more protective thresholds.                                                                     
             • AS 46.03.340(c): Requires DEC to make sure a                                                                     
               responder exposed to  PFAS contamination gets                                                                    
               up to three years  of voluntary blood testing                                                                    
               for PFAS levels.                                                                                                 
        2. AS 43.03.345:                                                                                                        
             • AS 46.03.345(a): When federal law no longer                                                                      
               requires  firefighting  foams  with  PFAS  in                                                                    
               them,   everyone   must  stop   using   PFAS-                                                                    
               containing foams.  (There is an  exception in                                                                    
               subsection (b).)                                                                                                 
             • AS 46.03.345(b) & (c): When the state fire                                                                       
               marshal  determines  there   is  a  safe  and                                                                    
               effective   alternative  to   PFAS-containing                                                                    
               firefighting  foams that  will  work for  the                                                                    
               oil and  gas industry  the fire  marshal must                                                                    
               publish  notice. At  that  point  no one  may                                                                    
               legally  use  PFAS   to  fight  fires  unless                                                                    
               federal law preempts Alaska law.                                                                                 
             • AS 46.03.345(d): DEC must take up to 25                                                                          
               gallons    per   year    of   PFAS-containing                                                                    
               firefighting    foam   from    Alaskans   for                                                                    
               disposal.                                                                                                        
        3. AS 46.03.359: Lists the PFAS compounds covered by                                                                    
          this bill and maintains DEC's authority to list                                                                       
          more.                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                
3:41:37 PM                                                                                                                    
CHAIR MICCICHE opened invited testimony on SB 176.                                                                              
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR COGHILL  noted that PFAS is  no small issue in  his area.                                                               
He asked  what the  breadth of  federal requirements  are because                                                               
PFAS use  is not just  for putting  out fires. PFAS  use includes                                                               
testing  and a  variety of  other  things. He  inquired what  the                                                               
federal timeline is for PFAS use.                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                
3:43:37 PM                                                                                                                    
JOHN   BINDER,   Deputy   Commissioner,  Alaska   Department   of                                                               
Transportation and Public Facilities,  Anchorage, Alaska, said he                                                               
oversees  state  owned  and  operated  airports  for  the  Alaska                                                               
Department  of Transportation  and  Public  Facilities (DOT).  He                                                               
noted that the  FAA requires fluorinated foam as  part of airport                                                               
safety  under  Part  139  of  the  FAA  regulations  for  airport                                                               
certification.  Alaska's certified  aviation  hubs are  basically                                                               
anywhere  Alaska Airlines  flies.  FAA  certification applies  to                                                               
airports  with air  carriers that  have aircraft  that can  carry                                                               
more than 30 passengers.                                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
He   detailed  that   FAA  certified   airports  have   stringent                                                               
requirements to  ensure safety and  crash response  that includes                                                               
the ability to  spray AFFF to put out  aircraft fires. Currently,                                                               
the FAA  does mandate the  use of fluorinated foams  that contain                                                               
PFAS.                                                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                
MR.   BINDER  said   the  sponsor   alluded  to   the  2018   FAA                                                               
Reauthorization Act that  directs the FAA to  develop and approve                                                               
a  new, non-fluorinated  foam  not later  than  October 1,  2021.                                                               
DOTPF  anticipates  that  by  October  2021  the  airports  would                                                               
hopefully be using a new foam named by the FAA.                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                
MR.  BINDER explained  that all  of  Alaska's certified  airports                                                               
store and use fluorinated foam.  Fluorinated foam usage goes back                                                               
40  years.  Approximately  30  airports in  the  state  have  had                                                               
fluorinated foam  located at them  at some point,  either through                                                               
DOTPF or the U.S. Department of Department Defense (DOD) use.                                                                   
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  COGHILL noted  that the  FAA is  coming up  with a  foam                                                               
replacement and asked how the logistics will work.                                                                              
                                                                                                                                
3:45:43 PM                                                                                                                    
MR. BINDER explained  that the FAA just finished  its new testing                                                               
facility and has  begun testing different systems.  He noted that                                                               
most  of  the rest  of  the  world already  uses  non-fluorinated                                                               
foams. However, the non-fluorinated foams  are widely known to be                                                               
less effective for  putting out fires and that is  why the United                                                               
States has not transitioned to the new foams.                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                
He conceded that  transitioning to the new foams  will take quite                                                               
some time  after they are identified.  Transition factors include                                                               
cleaning  equipment  and  PFAS disposal.  He  admitted  that  the                                                               
capability of getting PFAS out of equipment is unknown.                                                                         
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  COGHILL  expressed  interest   in  moving  on  the  PFAS                                                               
transition. He inquired if the  State can practically live in the                                                               
proposed timelines. He  asked what the PFAS  disposal method will                                                               
be, the cost, and how long it will take.                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
3:47:27 PM                                                                                                                    
DENISE  KOCH,   Director,  Division   of  Spill   Prevention  and                                                               
Response,  Alaska   Department  of   Environmental  Conservation,                                                               
Juneau,  Alaska,  acknowledged  that  the  disposal  question  is                                                               
important  and  difficult.  She  said  the  Organic  Incineration                                                               
Technology   (OIT)  in   Fairbanks   thermally  remediates   PFAS                                                               
contaminated  soil   but  does  not  currently   incinerate  PFAS                                                               
liquids. She  admitted that  the State will  likely have  to send                                                               
PFAS concentrates out of the state.                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                
MS. KOCH said other things to  keep in mind that could impact the                                                               
cost of disposal is potential  federal legislation to make PFAS a                                                               
hazardous   substance  under   the  Comprehensive   Environmental                                                               
Response Compensation and  Liability Act of 1980  (CERCLA) and to                                                               
make  it a  hazardous substance  under the  Resource Conservation                                                               
and Recovery Act  of 1976 (RCRA). There  are considerations about                                                               
prohibiting  PFAS incineration,  so there  is the  potential that                                                               
there will be limited options  for disposing of PFAS contaminated                                                               
soil or  foam. What could happen  is PFAS items would  be shipped                                                               
out of  state to a type  of RCRA approved landfill,  an expensive                                                               
process.                                                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
3:49:15 PM                                                                                                                    
SENATOR BISHOP asked  if the federal government listed  PFAS as a                                                               
hazardous substance  under CERCLA and  RCRA, could PFAS  sites be                                                               
Superfund sites.                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
MS.  KOCH  answered  yes  if  PFAS  are  listed  as  a  hazardous                                                               
substance   under  CERCLA.   However,   the  federal   government                                                               
currently has not identified PFAS as a hazardous substance.                                                                     
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  BISHOP  asked  what  the  typical cost  is  to  ship  an                                                               
overpacked 55-gallon drum out of state.                                                                                         
                                                                                                                                
MS. KOCH answered  that DEC struggled to  identify disposal costs                                                               
in its fiscal note. SB 176 requires  DEC to take up to 25 gallons                                                               
of PFAS concentrate  per person, so the assumption  is that major                                                               
firefighting organizations  throughout the state might  have PFAS                                                               
foam and  DEC would then  be receiving  foam for many  years. DEC                                                               
might  also  be  getting  PFAS  foam from  industry  as  well  as                                                               
government entities.                                                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
She  summarized  that DEC  estimates  that  the department  might                                                               
receive  as  many as  3,000  gallons  of  PFAS a  year.  However,                                                               
obtaining out-of-state disposal costs is difficult.                                                                             
                                                                                                                                
3:51:33 PM                                                                                                                    
SENATOR BISHOP asked  Mr. Binder to confirm that  PFAS based foam                                                               
has been used in Alaska for more than 40 years.                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                
MR. BINDER answered correct.                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR BISHOP asked  what firefighters used prior  to PFAS foam.                                                               
He  said firefighters  once  used pyrene  to  displace oxygen  in                                                               
fires, but pyrene use for fires is bad as well.                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                
MR. BINDER answered that he did not know.                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  BISHOP  asked  if  the  State  could  decontaminate  its                                                               
aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) trucks for further use.                                                                 
                                                                                                                                
MR. BINDER answered that the  department believes it can, but the                                                               
task would be quite a challenge.                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
He noted that  Senator Coghill asked about  testing and disclosed                                                               
that through 2018,  the FAA required every airport  to spray foam                                                               
to demonstrate accident  capabilities for certification. Starting                                                               
in 2019  there are systems  available that allow  testing without                                                               
discharging foam.  The current  policy is  the airports  will not                                                               
spray foam unless it is in response to an actual accident.                                                                      
                                                                                                                                
3:53:14 PM                                                                                                                    
SENATOR KAWASAKI  agreed that PFAS  is an issue in  the Fairbanks                                                               
area. He  noted that a  firefighting training center in  his area                                                               
is the PFAS culprit.                                                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
He noted  that if other  countries are using  the non-fluorinated                                                               
foams, which  countries outside  of the  United States  are using                                                               
fluorinated foams.                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                
MR. BINDER replied  that he is not sure what  other countries, if                                                               
any, are still  using fluorinated foams. Europe and  most of Asia                                                               
are using non-fluorinated foams.                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR KAWASAKI  asked what the  cost difference is  between the                                                               
fluorinated and non-fluorinated foams.                                                                                          
                                                                                                                                
MR.  BINDER  replied  that  he  is not  familiar  with  the  cost                                                               
information, but the department could provide the data.                                                                         
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR KAWASAKI  asked if other  countries have tested  the non-                                                               
fluorinated foams for toxicity and environmental impact.                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
MR. BINDER answered  that he is sure other  countries have tested                                                               
non-fluorinated foams  for toxicity and environmental  impact. He                                                               
remarked  that firefighting  foams  in general  are probably  not                                                               
good  for  a  person. He  said  he  is  not  sure what  the  non-                                                               
fluorinated foams comparison is with AFFF.                                                                                      
                                                                                                                                
CHAIR  MICCICHE remarked  that PFAS  is a  statewide problem.  He                                                               
said  he  is from  a  very  industrial  area and  has  personally                                                               
trained  as an  industrial  firefighter for  many  years and  his                                                               
level of concern has increased over time.                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                
He said he is curious if  the State has moved forward on actively                                                               
issuing  advice to  industrial firefighters  and fire  schools to                                                               
minimize or simulate training whenever possible.                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
3:55:52 PM                                                                                                                    
MR. BINDER  answered that  is the  case from  DOTPF's perspective                                                               
and the  firefighters within the  department. He  reiterated that                                                               
foam spraying  only occurs  in response  to actual  fires. People                                                               
are  aware now  of the  health  hazards involved  with PFAS.  All                                                               
firefighting  schools  within  the  state are  aware  and  taking                                                               
precautions.                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                
MS. KOCH noted that DEC  has had communications with firefighters                                                               
and firefighting organizations throughout  the state and they are                                                               
very  concerned about  the PFAS  issue,  both from  a safety  and                                                               
liability  perspective. However,  DEC has  not issued  any formal                                                               
regulation or  guidance. DEC  has generally  advised to  use best                                                               
practices when  possible and to use  non-fluorinated foams during                                                               
training.                                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  COGHILL  asked   where  the  State  is   in  testing  in                                                               
accordance with national requirements.                                                                                          
                                                                                                                                
3:58:47 PM                                                                                                                    
MS. KOCH answered that the  State has joint and several liability                                                               
for apportioning responsibility when  dealing with a response. In                                                               
terms  of the  standards  themselves, she  said  everyone in  the                                                               
country  is struggling  with the  PFAS  issue. PFAS  is a  health                                                               
concern priority for  a lot of states.  The Interstate Technology                                                               
& Regulatory Council (ITRC) is  a national group that tracks what                                                               
all  the  different state  levels  are.  There currently  are  34                                                               
states that do not have  PFAS specific guidelines or regulations.                                                               
A number  of states, Michigan  being one  that the bill  uses for                                                               
its levels,  that are  ahead of  the EPA.  Then there  are states                                                               
like Alaska that rely on the EPA levels.                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
MS.  KOCH detailed  that the  State is  using the  EPA's Lifetime                                                               
Health Advisory (HA) that sets the  value for PFAS and PFOA at 70                                                               
parts per  trillion for drinking  water. The EPA  established the                                                               
HA values  to protect  vulnerable populations  including pregnant                                                               
women and children.                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                
She  noted that  the  EPA  has expended  a  tremendous amount  of                                                               
resources  on PFAS.  They created  a PFAS  action plan  and added                                                               
more  staff and  resources  in their  recent  budget to  continue                                                               
their work on PFAS.                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                
She said  DEC feels  that the  HA levels  established by  EPA are                                                               
protective of  public health and  the environment, and  those are                                                               
the values that DEC is using right now.                                                                                         
                                                                                                                                
MS. KOCH summarized  that PFAS is an evolving  issue; the science                                                               
is  changing and  the  department's position  can  change as  the                                                               
science changes. The department  currently has adequate statutory                                                               
and  regulatory  authority to  deal  with  the PFAS  issue.  They                                                               
believe the  right way  to establish standards  is at  the agency                                                               
level because  agencies can  be nimble in  making changes  as the                                                               
science evolves.                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
4:02:15 PM                                                                                                                    
CHAIR  MICCICHE  observed that  industrial  fire  schools in  the                                                               
Lower 48 have  used a lot of  PFAS for 40 years  and the response                                                               
to their  use will likely  be at the  federal level. He  asked if                                                               
there is  the potential for  federal funding to help  Alaska deal                                                               
with the PFAS issue.                                                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
MS. KOCH  replied she is  not aware  of any such  federal funding                                                               
but a lot  of major federal agencies such as  the EPA, the Agency                                                               
for  Toxic  Substances  and Disease  Registry  (ATSDR),  and  the                                                               
Centers for Disease  Control and Prevention (CDC)  are working on                                                               
PFAS.  Congress is  considering  bills on  PFAS incineration  and                                                               
whether to officially make them  a hazardous substance under RCRA                                                               
and  Superfund. The  FAA is  trying to  find non-PFAS  foams that                                                               
would be  as effective at  fighting fires  and be better  for the                                                               
environment.                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR BISHOP asked if she is an industrial hygienist.                                                                         
                                                                                                                                
MS.  KOCH answered  no; she  has a  Master of  Science in  Public                                                               
Health.                                                                                                                         
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  BISHOP  said  he  will   save  his  question  should  an                                                               
industrial hygienist testify.                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                
4:04:36 PM                                                                                                                    
SENATOR KAWASAKI  suggested that  DEC should  consider contacting                                                               
firefighting agencies to  find out how much foam  was coming into                                                               
the state  and to let  them know about possible  PFAS replacement                                                               
to prevent having to export the materials.                                                                                      
                                                                                                                                
MS. KOCH replied  DEC has no way  to track how much  of PFAS foam                                                               
is  coming  into  the  state.   They  could  make  a  request  to                                                               
firefighting organizations to get  some sense of their inventory,                                                               
but that is probably the best the department can do.                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR   KAWASAKI   remarked   that  starting   to   voluntarily                                                               
transition firefighting  agencies away from PFAS  foams makes the                                                               
most sense.                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                
CHAIR  MICCICHE  suggested that  DEC  issue  some voluntary  PFAS                                                               
guidance  because there  are probably  a lot  of industries  that                                                               
require   a  healthy   reminder  on   potential  happenings   and                                                               
substantial  future cost  savings for  foam disposal  and cleanup                                                               
costs.                                                                                                                          
                                                                                                                                
4:07:32 PM                                                                                                                    
SENATOR COGHILL asked  what the mitigation strategy  is once PFAS                                                               
gets into the water.                                                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
MS.  KOCH  answered  that  handling PFAS  in  drinking  water  is                                                               
challenging.  Once DEC  finds  PFAS  to be  higher  than the  EPA                                                               
allowed HA levels, the department  requires the responsible party                                                               
to  provide individuals  with  clean  alternative drinking  water                                                               
sources.  The department  is not  at the  stage to  clean up  the                                                               
polluted water  source. She  said the department  is in  a triage                                                               
stage to  make sure alternative  drinking water occurs  first and                                                               
PFAS remediation in the ground water happens in the future.                                                                     
                                                                                                                                
4:10:07 PM                                                                                                                    
SENATOR COGHILL asked who pays for water testing.                                                                               
                                                                                                                                
MS. KOCH replied DEC requires  the responsible party to develop a                                                               
plan to  pay for testing  and provide a long-term  clean drinking                                                               
water solution for individuals impacted by PFAS.                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR COGHILL commented  that the people who  mandated PFAS for                                                               
the past 40 years may have culpability too.                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                
He asked what individuals do if they find PFAS in their blood.                                                                  
                                                                                                                                
4:12:35 PM                                                                                                                    
MS.  KOCH explained  that there  is no  mechanism to  remove PFAS                                                               
from a body.  She added that there are no  federal or state blood                                                               
standards  that  identifies  PFAS levels  for  expected  negative                                                               
health outcomes.                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR   COGHILL  commented   that  PFAS   chemicals  are   more                                                               
ubiquitous than just its use in a foam.                                                                                         
                                                                                                                                
MS.  KOCH agreed.  She said  PFAS is  commercially ubiquitous  in                                                               
everything  from nonstick  pans  to clothing,  carpets, and  food                                                               
packaging.  However, the  largest exposure  in Alaska  comes from                                                               
spraying PFAS as AFFF that gets into drinking water.                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  COGHILL  asked  if  PFAS,  a  long  chain  polymer,  was                                                               
developed just for firefighting.                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
4:15:26 PM                                                                                                                    
MS. KOCH answered  that PFAS use dates back to  the 1940s. It has                                                               
a fluorine bond that makes  it extremely difficult to break. That                                                               
is an attribute that lends itself  to commercial use but it means                                                               
that the chemical remains in the environment for a long time.                                                                   
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR COGHILL  summarized that  PFAS is new  as a  health risk,                                                               
but PFAS is not new as a fluorinate polymer.                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  BISHOP noted  that magnesium  cylinders  in engines  use                                                               
PFAS  as AFFF  to  displace oxygen  because  magnesium will  burn                                                               
under water.                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR  COGHILL  noted  that  the  bill  lists  seven  different                                                               
substances, but  the committee has  been talking about PFAS  as a                                                               
singular substance.                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                
4:17:59 PM                                                                                                                    
MS. KOCH  responded that the  most noted  are PFAS and  PFOA, but                                                               
they  are  2  out  of the  approximately  6,000  PFAS  compounds.                                                               
Standards are  generally based on  PFAS and PFOA because  the two                                                               
compounds   have  the   most  toxicological   and  human   health                                                               
information.                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR KAWASAKI  asked how  the list  of seven  established PFAS                                                               
and PFOA limits in the  bill differs from the existing regulatory                                                               
limits.                                                                                                                         
                                                                                                                                
4:20:01 PM                                                                                                                    
MS. KOCH answered that the limits  in the bill are lower than the                                                               
current regulatory  limits that DEC  relies on from the  EPA. The                                                               
bill lowers  PFOA to 8  parts per trillion  and PFAS to  16 parts                                                               
per trillion.                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR KAWASAKI  pointed out that  the concentration  limits are                                                               
significantly  lower in  the bill.  He observed  that the  limits                                                               
used in  the legislation from  the Michigan PFAS  Action Response                                                               
Team are in line with other  states that are also regulating PFAS                                                               
and PFOA in drinking water.                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                
MS. KOCH  explained that Michigan is  one of the states  that has                                                               
moved ahead  of the  EPA on  PFAS and  PFOA levels.  However, the                                                               
approximate eight states, including  Michigan, have not finalized                                                               
or promulgated their proposed drinking water regulations.                                                                       
                                                                                                                                
4:22:22 PM                                                                                                                    
CHAIR MICCICHE asked if there  is a schedule for potential action                                                               
or changes to the standard from the EPA.                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
MS. KOCH  replied the  EPA came  out with a  PFAS action  plan in                                                               
February 2019 that started an  evaluation under the Safe Drinking                                                               
Water Act  process to  determine the  necessity of  standards for                                                               
PFAS  compounds. The  EPA announced  in February  2020 that  they                                                               
were going  to make their  preliminary determination  proposal on                                                               
regulating PFAS  and PFOA. She noted  that the EPA will  at times                                                               
announce what  they are planning  to do  prior to posting  in the                                                               
federal register. She  surmised that the agency  would agree that                                                               
setting maximum containment levels for  PFAS and PFOA in drinking                                                               
water  is  necessary and  eventually  announce  a new  regulation                                                               
package.                                                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
4:24:49 PM                                                                                                                    
CHAIR MICCICHE  agreed that the  first priority is  safe drinking                                                               
water  for the  people of  Alaska.  He said  he appreciated  that                                                               
Senator  Kiehl  is  moving  forward  on  a  safe  drinking  water                                                               
program.                                                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
CHAIR  MICCICHE noted  that  the  bill has  a  fiscal note  which                                                               
defines and  establishes concentration limits,  periodic drinking                                                               
water  testing  in  PFAS  release  areas,  providing  alternative                                                               
drinking water, and voluntary blood  testing at no cost that also                                                               
includes exposed responders.  However, the responsibilities under                                                               
the proposed  legislation amounts  to approximately  $100 million                                                               
and the result does not include a cleanup.                                                                                      
                                                                                                                                
SENATOR KIEHL said  he does not see a $100  million a year fiscal                                                               
note for SB 176.                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                
CHAIR MICCICHE clarified  that the fiscal note is  for six years,                                                               
through FY2026.                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                
4:26:28 PM                                                                                                                    
CHAIR MICCICHE opened public testimony.                                                                                         
                                                                                                                                
4:26:57 PM                                                                                                                    
KELLY MCLAUGHLIN, representing  self, Gustavus, Alaska, testified                                                               
in support  of SB 176.  She said Gustavus  has lots of  wells and                                                               
PFAS contamination  in the community's water.  She exhibited eggs                                                               
from chickens  she raises at her  home, noting that the  eggs are                                                               
PFAS contaminated  with levels  ranging from  13 to  25,000 parts                                                               
per trillion.                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                
MS. MCLAUGHLIN  said SB  176 is in  response to  the contaminated                                                               
property owners, the  mothers and fathers of  children exposed to                                                               
PFAS in utero and early childhood  who can no longer safely raise                                                               
pets and livestock  on their lands or safely  harvest nearby wild                                                               
foods.                                                                                                                          
                                                                                                                                
She  noted  that  the  Alaska Department  of  Health  and  Social                                                               
Services (DHSS) refused  requests to test blood  and breast milk.                                                               
She added  that DEC disregarded  requests for a  health protected                                                               
maximum contamination level during a public comment period.                                                                     
                                                                                                                                
She said  the EPA must lower  its current levels of  70 parts per                                                               
trillion. She  suggested that  an agency create  a data  set from                                                               
PFAS blood test results to help establish body burden levels.                                                                   
                                                                                                                                
MS.  MCLAUGHLIN  summarized  that  the  use  of  PFAS  must  stop                                                               
immediately across the entire state  because the futures of every                                                               
Alaskan depends  on it. She  pointed out that if  London Heathrow                                                               
Airport can use non-fluorinated  alternatives, there is no reason                                                               
why the Gustavus Airport cannot use them as well.                                                                               
                                                                                                                                
4:30:58 PM                                                                                                                    
MELANIE LESH,  representing self, Gustavus, Alaska,  testified in                                                               
support of  SB 176.  She said the  Gustavus Airport  has probably                                                               
used AFFF via testing for the  whole 40 years. She noted that she                                                               
lives between  the airport runway  and the river, the  route that                                                               
ground water flows  that carries the PFAS chemicals  with it. She                                                               
said she  does not  see the  federal government  being a  lead on                                                               
PFAS and states must step up.                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                
4:33:06 PM                                                                                                                    
JON  ERICKSON, Manager,  City and  Borough  of Yakutat,  Yakutat,                                                               
Alaska,  testified  in  support  of   SB  176.  He  said  he  has                                                               
experience with  mitigating pollution problems in  Yakutat. Three                                                               
wells at the  Yakutat Airport tested positive for  PFAS 18 months                                                               
ago. DOT  is shipping drinking  water to the restaurant  near the                                                               
airport. He  noted that he has  asked DEC to share  water testing                                                               
results. He said extending Yakutat  municipal water system to the                                                               
airport will solve the problem.                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                
4:37:37 PM                                                                                                                    
PAMELA  MILLER, Executive  Director, Alaska  Community Action  on                                                               
Toxics, Anchorage,  Alaska, testified in  support of SB  176. She                                                               
said  PFAS  contamination  represents  a  significant  threat  to                                                               
drinking water  sources and public health  throughout Alaska. The                                                               
PFAS  issue  requires  urgent  action  from  the  legislature  to                                                               
prevent  further harm,  ensure safe  drinking water  supplies for                                                               
contaminated  communities,   provide  responsible   cleanup,  and                                                               
establish measures to monitor and  protect the health of affected                                                               
community members and first responders.                                                                                         
                                                                                                                                
She  noted   that  yesterday,  Washington   state  overwhelmingly                                                               
approved  in a  bipartisan way  the  strongest state  ban in  the                                                               
country to  phase out toxic  PFAS chemicals in  firefighting foam                                                               
and  eliminate important  exemptions. She  said Washington  state                                                               
sets  an important  precedent that  the Alaska  State Legislature                                                               
should follow.                                                                                                                  
                                                                                                                                
4:43:17 PM                                                                                                                    
DAVID  BERREY, member,  Wake Up  Alaskans to  the Toxic  Reality,                                                               
Fairbanks,  Alaska,  testified in  support  of  SB 176.  He  said                                                               
Fairbanks  has a  plume at  the regional  training center  at the                                                               
airport, Moose  Creek, and an  unreported plume coming  from Fort                                                               
Wainwright. He remarked  that there has been no  testing or water                                                               
provided. He  added that there is  no PFAS testing on  people who                                                               
died  of  cancer.  He  asked  the  legislature  to  provide  PFAS                                                               
oversite.                                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                
4:46:15 PM                                                                                                                    
SALLY SCHLICHTING,  representing self, Juneau,  Alaska, testified                                                               
in  support  of SB  176.  She  noted that  she  is  a former  DEC                                                               
employee  with  the  contaminated  site  program  where  she  was                                                               
responsible for  developing regulations and policy  for hazardous                                                               
substances such as PFAS.                                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
She said  SB 176  is necessary because  it would  establish clear                                                               
statutory  direction for  DEC to  carry out  testing of  drinking                                                               
water in Alaska that is at risk  due to a release of PFAS. If DEC                                                               
continues to maintain  that they cannot set levels  until the EPA                                                               
does, Alaskans will likely wait many years for protection.                                                                      
                                                                                                                                
MS. SCHLICHTING suggested that the  bill require testing fish and                                                               
subsistence  foods  near PFAS  release  sites,  include the  full                                                               
suite of PFAS compounds testing  in drinking water, and place the                                                               
authority for blood testing with DHSS.                                                                                          
                                                                                                                                
4:49:05 PM                                                                                                                    
BROOKE  IVY,  External  Affairs   Manager,  Alaska  Oil  and  Gas                                                               
Association  (AOGA), Anchorage,  Alaska, testified  in opposition                                                               
of SB 176.  She said while AOGA expresses  concerns with specific                                                               
provisions in SB 176 as  currently written, overall, AOGA is very                                                               
much appreciative of the legislation's goal.                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                
She  said AFFF  is a  highly effective  foam used  to fight  high                                                               
hazard flammable liquid  fires by the oil and  gas industry. AFFF                                                               
remains  the only  product  available  to effectively  extinguish                                                               
hydrocarbon  fires   at  refineries  and  fuel   terminals.  AOGA                                                               
appreciates that  SB 176  does provide an  exemption for  the oil                                                               
and gas industry  to use AFFF even if no  longer required by law,                                                               
should no effective alternative be available.                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                
MS. IVY  specified that the  association's concern lies  with the                                                               
subsection that provides  authority to the state  fire marshal to                                                               
determine  a  safe  and effective  alternative  foam.  Should  an                                                               
effective  alternative become  available, transitioning  industry                                                               
systems will  likely require a  multi-year phase-out  process and                                                               
the bill is  unclear on time allotment. The  association also has                                                               
questions  about the  studies that  contributed  to the  proposed                                                               
cutoff concentrations in the bill.                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                
MS.  IVY summarized  that AOGA  feels  the language  in the  bill                                                               
should fully account for PFAS  exposure coming from many sources,                                                               
not  just AFFF.  The  language  must be  clear  on targeted  PFAS                                                               
release, especially given the liability statutes.                                                                               
                                                                                                                                
4:52:51 PM                                                                                                                    
CHAIR  MICCICHE announced  that the  committee will  not hear  SB
232.                                                                                                                            
                                                                                                                                
4:53:31 PM                                                                                                                    
PATRICE LEE,  member, Citizens for Clean  Air, Fairbanks, Alaska,                                                               
testified in  support of  SB 176.  She said  Fairbanks has  a bad                                                               
problem  with PFAS  and wintertime  air pollution,  a combination                                                               
that could impact  student performance. There is no  time to wait                                                               
for cleaning up  and stopping PFAS usage. The State  must set the                                                               
strictest levels for protection. The  valid science that has been                                                               
around for decades  showing that PFAS is  horribly detrimental to                                                               
human health.                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                
4:56:15 PM                                                                                                                    
PAUL LIEDBERG,  representing self, Dillingham,  Alaska, testified                                                               
in support of SB  176. He said Dillingham as well  as a number of                                                               
other communities  in Alaska  are experiencing  the contamination                                                               
of  ground water  from PFAS.  He suggested  that the  bill should                                                               
include testing  for individuals who have  used PFAS contaminated                                                               
water sources in the past.                                                                                                      
                                                                                                                                
MR. LIEDBERG said  there has been little or no  regulation on the                                                               
federal or  state level  of a  chemical that  has proven  to have                                                               
negative health effects.  At a minimum, the  State should provide                                                               
testing to residents and first  responders when PFAS exposure has                                                               
occurred. He  summarized that the  legislation is one  small step                                                               
in dealing with a forever chemical.                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                
4:59:10 PM                                                                                                                    
JIM WILLIAMS,  Chief of  Staff, Administration  Center, Fairbanks                                                               
North Star  Borough, Fairbanks, Alaska,  testified in  support of                                                               
SB 176. He said the borough  assembly has not taken a position on                                                               
PFAS  or PFOA,  but there  are some  operational things  that the                                                               
borough  is  working  through.  The  borough  pulled  wells  from                                                               
irrigation  at   soccer  and  softball   fields  due   to  either                                                               
contamination   for  discharge   standards   or  drinking   water                                                               
standards.                                                                                                                      
                                                                                                                                
He noted that  the borough is seeing more  contaminated wells. He                                                               
said the  borough must address a  plan to get clean  drinking and                                                               
irrigation water to communities. The  borough does not have water                                                               
utility powers, but  it is monitoring the extension  of the North                                                               
Pole water  utility out of  Moose Creek. The $30  million project                                                               
provided service  for approximately 100 households.  The question                                                               
is  what the  cost  will  be if  the  Badger  Road area  requires                                                               
service for approximately 4,000 households.                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                
MR. WILLIAMS  summarized that the borough  must consider economic                                                               
development  for the  next 10  or 15  years. It  must acknowledge                                                               
whether  the final  solution  is delivering  water  in trucks  or                                                               
putting a ground water utility in.                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                
5:02:16 PM                                                                                                                    
CHAIR MICCICHE held SB 176 in committee.                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                
5:02:54 PM                                                                                                                    
There being  no further  business to  come before  the committee,                                                               
Chair Micciche adjourned the  Senate Resources Standing Committee                                                               
meeting at 5:02 p.m.                                                                                                            

Document Name Date/Time Subjects
SB 176 ver. E.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Sponsor Statement 02.13.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Sectional Analysis ver. E 02.13.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 PFAS Reference Sheet 03.04.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Fiscal Note DEC-SPAR 03.02.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Fiscal Note DEC-EH 03.02.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Fiscal Note DPS-FLS 02.28.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Supporting Documents ATSDR PFAS Information Sheet 02.13.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Supporting Documents EPA PFAS Information Sheet 02.13.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Supporting Documents Michigan Report on PFAS Health Effect-Executive Summary 02.13.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Written Testimony combined as of 03.05.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Draft Amendment E.1 03.04.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Draft Amendment E.2 03.04.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 232 v. A.PDF SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 232
SB 232 Sponsor Statement v. A 03.05.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 232
SB 232 Fiscal Note DFG-DAS 03.03.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 232
City_of_Kenai_Personal_Use_Fishery_Letter 1-7-20.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 232 Letter of Support-City of Kenai
SB 232 Supporting Documents-Fish Carcass.JPG SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 232
SB 232 Supporting Documents-Kenai River-South Beach.jpg SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 232
SB 232 Supporting Documents-Kenai River-North Beach.jpg SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 232
SB 176 Written Testimony Pamela Miller -with attachments 03.06.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Written Testimony ACAT Letter 03.05.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Written Testimony David Berrey 03.05.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176
SB 176 Written Testimony Sally Schlichting 03.06.2020.pdf SRES 3/6/2020 3:30:00 PM
SB 176