Legislature(1993 - 1994)

03/01/1993 09:10 AM FIN

Audio Topic
* first hearing in first committee of referral
+ teleconferenced
= bill was previously heard/scheduled
txt
                                                                               
                             MINUTES                                           
                    SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE                                   
                          March 1, 1993                                        
                            9:10 a.m.                                          
                                                                               
  TAPES                                                                        
                                                                               
  SFC-93, #32, Side 1                                                          
  SFC-93, #32, Side 2                                                          
                                                                               
  CALL TO ORDER                                                                
                                                                               
  Senator Drue  Pearce,  Co-chair,  convened  the  meeting  at                 
  approximately 9:10 a.m.                                                      
                                                                               
  PRESENT                                                                      
                                                                               
  In addition to  Co-chairs Pearce and Frank,  Senators Kelly,                 
  Kerttula and Sharp  were present.  Senators Jacko and Rieger                 
  were not present.                                                            
                                                                               
  ALSO  ATTENDING:   Senator Rick Halford,  sponsor of  SB 19;                 
  Dean J.  Guaneli,  Chief, Criminal  Division, Department  of                 
  Law; Teresa  Sager-Stancliff, Aide  to Senator  Mike Miller,                 
  sponsor of  SB 46;  Dave Kellyhouse,  Director, Division  of                 
  Wildlife  Conservation, Department  of Fish  and Game;  Doug                 
  Welton,  himself; Janice  Adair,  Asst. Commissioner,  Chief                 
  Administrative Officer, Legislative  Contact, Department  of                 
  Environmental  Conservation;  Brook  Miles,   Alaska  Public                 
  Offices  Commission;  Cindy   Roberts,  Special   Assistant,                 
  Department of Commerce and  Economic Development; Josh Fink,                 
  Aide  to Senator  Tim  Kelly; Brooke  Miles,  Administrator,                 
  Alaska    Public    Offices   Commission,    Department   of                 
  Administration;  C.E.   Swackhammer,  Deputy   Commissioner,                 
  Department  of  Public Safety;  Mike  Greany,  Director, and                 
  Karen   Rehfeld,  Fiscal   Analyst,   and  other   analysts,                 
  Legislative  Finance  Division;   and  aides  to   committee                 
  members.                                                                     
                                                                               
  SUMMARY INFORMATION                                                          
                                                                               
  CSSB 19(JUD):  An Act relating to the crime of conspiracy.                   
                                                                               
                 Testimony  was  heard  by   Senator  Halford,                 
                 sponsor of  SB 19,  and Dean  Guaneli, Chief,                 
                 Department  of  Law.   The  bill was  HELD in                 
                 committee pending submission of  new language                 
                 by  Dean  Guaneli   and  Senators  Kelly  and                 
                 Halford.                                                      
                                                                               
  SB 46:         An Act authorizing moose farming.                             
                                                                               
                 Testimony   was   heard   by  Teresa   Sager-                 
                 Stancliff, Aide to  Sen. Mike Miller, sponsor                 
                                                                               
                                                                               
                 of SB 46; Dave Kellyhouse, Director, Division                 
                 of Wildlife Conservation, Department  of Fish                 
                 and Game; Doug Welton, testified on behalf of                 
                 himself;    and    Janice     Adair,    Asst.                 
                 Commissioner,  Chief Administrative  Officer,                 
                 Legislative     Contact,    Department     of                 
                 Environmental  Conservation.    The bill  was                 
                 HELD  in  committee  pending   definition  of                 
                 "surplus" moose.                                              
                                                                               
  SB 49:         An  Act  relating  to   preelection  reports;                 
                 closing  the two-day  reporting gap  in those                 
                 reports;  setting the date of February 15 for                 
                 filing year-end campaign finance reports; and                 
                 requiring reporting of zero year-end reports.                 
                                                                               
                 Discussion was had by Senator Kelly and Brook                 
                 Miles, Alaska Public  Offices Commission.  SB                 
                 49 was REPORTED  OUT of committee with  a "do                 
                 pass" and with a zero  fiscal note for Alaska                 
                 Public  Offices  Commission,   Department  of                 
                 Administration.  Co-chairs Pearce  and Frank,                 
                 Senators Kelly and Sharp signed a  "do pass."                 
                 Senator     Kerttula     signed     a     "no                 
                 recommendation."                                              
                                                                               
  CO-CHAIR DRUE PEARCE announced that  three bills were before                 
  the committee.  She said she was not aware of any amendments                 
  to SB 19, Crime  of Conspiracy.  She informed  the committee                 
  that there was a new CS for SB 46, Authorize  Moose Farming,                 
  and  her intent  was to  hold this bill  in committee.   She                 
  asked the committee to pass SB 49, Year-End Campaign Finance                 
  Reports, out of committee.                                                   
                                                                               
                                                                               
  CS FOR SENATE BILL NO. 19(JUD):                                              
                                                                               
       An Act relating to the crime of conspiracy.                             
                                                                               
  Co-chair  Pearce  announced  that  CSSB  19 was  before  the                 
  committee and invited  Senator Rick Halford, sponsor  of the                 
  bill, to join the committee at the table.  She asked Senator                 
  Halford to  speak to the fiscal  notes as well as  giving an                 
  overview of the bill.                                                        
                                                                               
  SENATOR RICK HALFORD stated that a similar bill to SB 19 had                 
  passed the Senate in the 1992  legislative session.  He said                 
  that SB 19 recognizes the crime  of conspiracy and makes the                 
  penalty one step down from the commission of that crime.  He                 
  said that Alaska was one of the few states that did not have                 
  conspiracy legislation.   He directed attention to  the zero                 
  fiscal notes  for the Department  of Law  and Department  of                 
  Public Safety.   The  Court System  shows a  fiscal note  of                 
                                                                               
                                                                               
  $121.1, and Department of Corrections,  $365.0.  He observed                 
  that the two highest fiscal notes, totaling almost $1M, were                 
  for the Office of Public Advocacy  at $513.0, and the Public                 
  Defender Agency showing $402.6.  He felt the two high fiscal                 
  notes  were  unrealistic,  and  reflected  the  departments'                 
  disapproval of the  legislation.  He asked  the committee to                 
  consider the reasoning  of the Department  of Law that  said                 
  more cases  could be settled  with a  conspiracy statute  in                 
  place than might be settled otherwise.                                       
                                                                               
  SENATOR JAY KERTTULA  pointed out that the  zero fiscal note                 
  by  the Department of  Law conversely showed  its support of                 
  CSSB 19.  He suspected that there  would be some cost to the                 
  Department of  Law.   He supported  any  statute that  would                 
  increase  the   chance  of   convicting  felons  and   other                 
  criminals.  He  asked Senator Halford  to speak to the  fact                 
  that  nationwide, the  conspiracy  statutes  have been  used                 
  extensively to convict white collar criminals.                               
                                                                               
  Senator Halford said that last session the House had made an                 
  effort  to  broaden  the conspiracy  bill  to  include other                 
  crimes.  He maintained that CSSB  19 only dealt with serious                 
  felony  offenses.    In answer  to  Co-chair  Frank, Senator                 
  Halford defined  a "serious  felony offense"  as an  offense                 
  "...against  a  person  under  AS  11.41, punishable  as  an                 
  unclassified  or  class  A felony,"  such  as  murder, rape,                 
  kidnapping,  "or involving  controlled  substances under  AS                 
  11.71, punishable as  an unclassified, class  A, or class  B                 
  felony," such as trafficking drugs.                                          
                                                                               
  DEAN  J. GUANELI,  Chief, Criminal  Division, Department  of                 
  Law, spoke to class B felonies in connection with controlled                 
  substances.  He said the  primary offense under this statute                 
  was the sale of cocaine.  A class A felony was primarily the                 
  sale  of  heroin, and  unclassified  drug  offenses targeted                 
  large drug  rings, and  the sale  of heroin  and cocaine  to                 
  minors.   In  answer to  Co-chair Frank,  Mr.  Guaneli said,                 
  under current Alaska law, criminal liability can attach to a                 
  person that pulls  the trigger, or  to someone who aids  and                 
  abets that person, or to a  person that attempts that crime.                 
  He said  what is missing in Alaska  law, that exists in most                 
  other states, is  the ability  to attach criminal  liability                 
  when two people  get together to plan a felony, and begin to                 
  carry  it out.    He explained  that  the theory  underlying                 
  conspiracy was that it is important  to stop an offense such                 
  as contract murder, early in the planning stages.  The other                 
  theory is that when two people get together to plan a crime,                 
  it is  more likely that it  will happen.   He admitted, that                 
  within Alaska, other theories of  criminal liability, aiding                 
  and abetting,  soliciting, overlap to  some extent.   But he                 
  felt there  are particular circumstances  involving criminal                 
  organizations and drug rings  where the only way to  reach a                 
  criminal is through a conspiracy law.                                        
                                                                               
                                                                               
  Co-chair Frank  asked how  many additional situations  would                 
  CSSB  19  create where  the  Department  of Law  would  make                 
  arrests, and/or take to court individuals, and  how that was                 
  reflected in the  zero fiscal note.   Mr. Guaneli said  that                 
  there were very few cases where conspiracy would be the only                 
  crime charged.   The conspiracy offense would  almost always                 
  be  combined  with   other  more  serious  offenses.     The                 
  conspiracy offense, being a lesser offense, could be used to                 
  plea bargain, for  example, to  facilitate testimony, or  if                 
  there is not enough  evidence to hold the individual  on the                 
  more serious offense, conspiracy would be the only remaining                 
  offense.                                                                     
                                                                               
  SENATOR TIM  KELLY had  noticed on  the Judiciary  Committee                 
  Report  that  two senators  had  recommended "do  pass" with                 
  amendments.  He asked  what those amendments were.   Senator                 
  Halford said that the amendments were similar to  ones added                 
  last  session to the  House conspiracy bill.   One amendment                 
  said  that an individual who  was originally involved in the                 
  conspiracy, but after  alerting the police, could  return as                 
  an  undercover agent in  that conspiracy,  and would  not be                 
  charged  in  the  conspiracy.   Another  amendment  said the                 
  individual had  to agree  to, take  action, and  communicate                 
  about the crime, in  order to be charged.   Another question                 
  was whether a law  enforcement officer could be  involved in                 
  the beginning of a conspiracy.  Senator Kerttula agreed that                 
  someone in the law enforcement agency might initiate a crime                 
  and that could become part of  a conspiracy.  In which case,                 
  nothing  would  have  ever  happened  if  it  had  not  been                 
  initiated in  the first place.  He  pointed out that CSSB 19                 
  would increase  the cost for the entire  justice system, and                 
  quoted from  the backup for  the Department of  Law's fiscal                 
  note.                                                                        
                                                                               
  Mr. Guaneli said  conspiracy laws formerly introduced  had a                 
  much broader range.   Senator Kerttula asked Mr.  Guaneli if                 
  he  had enough  funding to run  the Department of  Law.  Mr.                 
  Guaneli said that any agency could  use more money, and this                 
  year  there was a  small increase in  the Governor's funding                 
  this year.                                                                   
                                                                               
  Mr.  Guaneli noted  that  CSSB 19  was  directed at  serious                 
  offenses.  He stated that a directive would be issued to all                 
  law enforcement agencies that it not their responsibility to                 
  file charges involving  conspiracy.  After a  careful review                 
  of  the  evidence, prosecutors  would  make the  decision to                 
  charge  an individual  with a  conspiracy.   He assured  the                 
  committee  that  he  would  not   be  coming  back  to   the                 
  legislature asking for additional funding if CSSB 19 passed.                 
                                                                               
  Senator Kerttula said  that it was his  long experience that                 
  the   present   administration's  attitude   toward  certain                 
  legislation may change drastically in ten years or less, and                 
  could  run off in another direction without controls of some                 
                                                                               
                                                                               
  kind in place.                                                               
                                                                               
  Co-chair Frank asked  how CSSB  19 would be  limited to  the                 
  Department of Law.  Mr. Guaneli  said even though the police                 
  would have the authority  to file a conspiracy complaint  in                 
  court, the Department of  Law would discourage it.   He said                 
  that Department of Law would  insist that conspiracy charges                 
  would originate  in the Department  of Law.   Co-chair Frank                 
  asked  if the Department of Law would like to see wording to                 
  that effect in CSSB 19.  Mr. Guaneli said he felt that would                 
  not be necessary.   He proposed that the state  troopers and                 
  the larger police agencies would cooperate in this area.                     
                                                                               
  Discussion followed between Senators Kelly, Kerttula and Mr.                 
  Guaneli  regarding  language  in  the  bill  speaking  to  a                 
  conspiracy charge not  being initiated  by an undercover  or                 
  law  enforcement  authority.    Mr.  Guaneli felt  that  the                 
  entrapment laws took care of that concern.  Senator Kerttula                 
  proposed that a letter  of intent be added to CSSB  19.  Co-                 
  chair  Pearce  agreed  to  work  with  Senator  Kerttula  on                 
  language for a letter of intent.                                             
                                                                               
  Co-chair  Frank  related  his concern  that  this  law would                 
  increase  the  number of  individuals  jailed and  length of                 
  sentences,  which   in  turn  would   raise  Department   of                 
  Corrections'  costs.   Mr.  Guaneli said  that  CSSB 19  was                 
  amended  in  Senate Judiciary  Committee  to say  that proof                 
  beyond  a  reasonable  doubt  of   intent  to  facilitate  a                 
  particular crime, an agreement between  two parties to carry                 
  it out, and an overt act in order to charge an individual of                 
  conspiracy.  Included in that amendment was a definition  of                 
  an  overt  act.   He  concluded  that in  the  terms of  the                 
  elements that  have to be proven,  it showed that it  was an                 
  act that should have been stopped.                                           
                                                                               
  Senator Kelly suggested that the letter of intent state that                 
  CSSB 19 was not meant to  get around the entrapment statute.                 
  Co-chair Pearce asked Senators Kelly, Kerttula, Halford, and                 
  Mr. Guaneli to draft a letter of intent for CSSB  19 .  With                 
  no further testimony to be  heard, Co-chair Pearce announced                 
  that CSSB  19 would be HELD in  committee and heard again on                 
  Wednesday, March 3, 1993.                                                    
                                                                               
                                                                               
  SENATE BILL NO. 46:                                                          
                                                                               
       An Act authorizing moose farming.                                       
                                                                               
  Co-chair  Pearce  announced  that  SB   46  was  before  the                 
  committee.   Co-chair Frank MOVED  for adoption of  the work                 
  draft CSSB 46 dated February 26, 1993.  No objections having                 
  been raised, CSSB  46 was  ADOPTED for discussion  purposes.                 
  Co-chair  Pearce  invited  Teresa Sager-Stancliff,  Aide  to                 
                                                                               
                                                                               
  Senator Mike Miller,  sponsor of SB  46, to join members  at                 
  the  committee table and speak to  the changes in the CS for                 
  SB 46.                                                                       
                                                                               
  TERESA SAGER-STANCLIFF,  aide to  Senator Mike  Miller, said                 
  the CS gave several state agencies regulatory authority over                 
  moose farming.   The Department  of Natural Resources  (DNR)                 
  would be  given the authority  to promote and  develop moose                 
  farming, and regulate it as it does domestic livestock.  The                 
  Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) would also be                 
  given the  authority to  regulate moose  farming as  it does                 
  domestic livestock.  That would mean DEC would be authorized                 
  to visit and  inspect moose  farms for experiments,  provide                 
  care and  breeding disease  prevention, and  certify that  a                 
  facility would be able to  prevent disease transmission from                 
  captive moose to wild moose or  other wild animals, and from                 
  captive livestock  to other  domestic livestock.   It  would                 
  also give  the  Department  of  Fish  and  Game  (DF&G)  the                 
  authority to require certain provisions of a moose facility.                 
  DF&G  would  require  a  certificate  from  DEC  on  disease                 
  prevention and transmission,  ear tattooing  and an ear  tag                 
  for  identification.   It  would  require  escape-proof  and                 
  entry-proof  fencing,  and  notification  of  birth,   sale,                 
  slaughter,  escape  and  death  of a  captive  moose.    The                 
  applicant would have  to agree to pay for  a necropsy when a                 
  captive moose dies to  determine the cause of death,  and be                 
  required to notify  DF&G if a  wild animal enters the  moose                 
  farming facility within 24-hours of the entry.  The facility                 
  would have to register their  moose with all three agencies,                 
  DEC, DF&G,  and DNR.  She said  the importation of moose for                 
  moose  farming  purposes,  and raising  moose  and  domestic                 
  livestock  on the  same facility  would be prohibited.   She                 
  informed  the  committee  that   the  two  amendments  being                 
  proposed were agreed to  by Senator Mike Miller,  sponsor of                 
  SB 46.                                                                       
                                                                               
  In answer to Senator Kerttula, Ms. Sager-Stancliff said that                 
  the way CSSB  46 was  presently written, domestic  livestock                 
  and  moose  would  not  be  allowed  in the  same  facility.                 
  Senator  Kerttula  advised  that   brucellosis  was  a  very                 
  dangerous and  easily transmitted  disease between  domestic                 
  and wild animals,  and this disease alone  made him cautious                 
  about domesticating moose.  Ms.  Sager Stancliff agreed that                 
  was also a concern of Senator Miller's.                                      
                                                                               
  End SFC-93 #32, Side 1                                                       
  Begin SFC-93 #32, Side 2                                                     
                                                                               
  DAVE    KELLYHOUSE,    Director,   Division    of   Wildlife                 
  Conservation, Department of Fish  and Game, thanked  Senator                 
  Miller for including language that addressed DF&G's concerns                 
  regarding moose farming.  He said that a new fiscal note had                 
  not  been  prepared  for CSSB  46.    He  said that  if  the                 
  legislature and its constituents  believe that the potential                 
                                                                               
                                                                               
  benefits of  moose farming  are great  enough to offset  the                 
  concerns and problems foreseen by  DF&G, then he recommended                 
  the  state  proceed  cautiously.   He  offered  a conceptual                 
  alternative to CSSB 46 that would provide for a  well-funded                 
  pilot project jointly administered by DF&G, DEC and DNR over                 
  the next five  years.   He suggested five  years because  in                 
  that time a moose could mature and reproduce, and monitoring                 
  could  be done  of  the operation  and  procedures could  be                 
  developed  to  safeguard  Alaska's  wildlife  resource.   He                 
  proposed that Alaska's  wildlife was worth  over a $100M  in                 
  hunting alone plus hundreds of  millions in tourist dollars.                 
  He said that  whatever approach  the legislature would  take                 
  regarding moose  farming, DF&G  should  be given  regulatory                 
  authority along with  DNR and DEC.  He  stated that DF&G had                 
  over 20 years experience for captive moose in the state.  He                 
  reiterated  that the potential  for disease  transmission to                 
  animals and humans, and the potential for poaching, are real                 
  concerns that must be dealt with if SB 46 was to pass.                       
                                                                               
  Co-chair Pearce questioned DF&G's request for a 5-year pilot                 
  project.  She felt that DF&G already had spent 30 years on a                 
  pilot project at  the moose  research center, and  questions                 
  should have been answered there.  She  said she was tired of                 
  DF&G saying no in a new way.                                                 
                                                                               
  Senator Kerttula said that money had  been funded to visit a                 
  large Scandinavian  moose facility.   His  opinion was  that                 
  questions  could  be  answered   by  investigating  existing                 
  facilities.  He said his  main concerns were biological, and                 
  cost to the state in the  enforcement of new regulations for                 
  moose facilities.                                                            
                                                                               
  In  answer to  Co-chair  Pearce's  request, Mr.  Kelleyhouse                 
  agreed to have  a new  fiscal note and  position paper  from                 
  DF&G ready for the next committee meeting.  Senator Kerttula                 
  asked  DF&G  to  speak to  his  suggestion  that information                 
  regarding moose  farming  was readily  available from  other                 
  facilities.   Mr. Kelleyhouse  said that  Dr. Chuck  Swartz,                 
  senior research biologist at the  moose research center, had                 
  contacted all the game farm operations in North America  and                 
  also one  in the Soviet Union.   He said the information Dr.                 
  Swartz had gathered has been the basis of DF&G testimony for                 
  the last  two years.   He said  Dr. Swartz was  developing a                 
  manuscript  on  moose farming,  and  it should  be available                 
  within two weeks.                                                            
                                                                               
  Mr.  Kelleyhouse explained  that what  he meant  by a  pilot                 
  program in earlier testimony was  that DF&G would work  with                 
  private enterprise at  a moose  facility.  Senator  Kerttula                 
  asked if DF&G felt that it  would take another five years of                 
  research at a facility or  does DF&G have enough information                 
  at this time.   Mr. Kelleyhouse said he believed  that moose                 
  farming  would  not be  commercially  viable in  Alaska, and                 
  there were other  problems too.   He said the DF&G  research                 
                                                                               
                                                                               
  and information  has been  collected in other  jurisdictions                 
  and situations.   If moose  farming is going  to proceed  in                 
  Alaska under Alaskan situations,  other questions would have                 
  to be answered such as, availability of feed, transportation                 
  corridors, etc.  But he stated that DF&G would be willing to                 
  work with DEC and DNR in that regard.                                        
                                                                               
  JANICE ADAIR, Assistant  Commissioner, Chief  Administrative                 
  Officer,  Legislative  Contact, Department  of Environmental                 
  Conservation,  said that DEC did  not have any problems with                 
  SB  46.   She pointed out  that DEC  has a meat  and poultry                 
  inspection program, and within that program, employs a state                 
  veterinarian,  Dr. Bert  Gore.  She  quoted from  Dr. Gore's                 
  letter which addresses disease transmission, dated  February                 
  25, 1993 (copy on  file).  She read, "Confined  animals have                 
  difficulty transmitting disease to wildlife or other animals                 
  if there is no  contact.  Disease could only  be transmitted                 
  from  confined  animals   to  others   using  a  vector   or                 
  intermediate host," such as a flea.  "To date I am not aware                 
  of any  vectors, i.e.,  flies, ticks,  or snails,  in Alaska                 
  which  have  been incriminated  in  disease  transmission in                 
  livestock" with the exception  of dogs and cats who  "do get                 
  tapeworms from  shrews, rabbits and  some fleas."   She also                 
  said  that   Dr.  Gore,  because  of   research  information                 
  available, supported  the farming of  indigenous species  in                 
  Alaska.                                                                      
                                                                               
  Senator Kerttula said that he disagreed with Dr. Gore in his                 
  evaluation of  disease transmission.   He said a  vector did                 
  not have to be involved in disease transmission.  He said it                 
  could  simply be  a  dog that  went  under a  fence  and had                 
  contact with an animal, or simply  an animal that stepped in                 
  infected fecal matter.   He warned  that it was a  dangerous                 
  situation and not to be taken lightly.                                       
                                                                               
  Co-chair  Pearce  asked  Cindy Roberts,  Special  Assistant,                 
  Department of  Commerce  and Economic  Development,  if  she                 
  wished  to  testify.    CINDY   ROBERTS  answered  that  the                 
  Department  of  Commerce  and  Economic  Development  was in                 
  support of SB 46, and directed the committee's attention  to                 
  a position paper by the Department in their files.                           
                                                                               
  Co-chair Pearce invited Doug Welton to join the committee at                 
  the table.  Since Mr. Welton had testified before in support                 
  of SB 46,  she asked  him to  confine his  testimony to  the                 
  changes to SB 46.                                                            
                                                                               
  DOUG  WELTON,  testifying for  himself,  said that  for five                 
  years he had  been working on  legislation to approve  moose                 
  farming.  He  felt a key to  passing SB 46 was  defining the                 
  word "surplus."   He said  that all over  Alaska moose  were                 
  being  killed by  cars and the  railroad.   He felt  that if                 
  individuals were allowed to salvage some of the "surplus" or                 
  orphaned moose,  and  relocated them  to  a farm,  it  would                 
                                                                               
                                                                               
  provide an opportunity  for tourism and  education.  He  was                 
  grateful that  DF&G, for the  first time, had  offered their                 
  support to private moose enterprise.   He felt DF&G had been                 
  studying moose for  years.  Mr.  Welton admitted that  moose                 
  had been found to be one of the most uneconomical animals to                 
  raise  because  of their  peculiarities  and need  for large                 
  tracts of  land.   He agreed  that anyone  looking at  moose                 
  farming would  have to have  other financial  support.   His                 
  idea was to  develop a milk,  yogurt and cheese market,  and                 
  hoped someday, to have a small moose  herd to pass on to his                 
  children.    He  said  that raising  moose  gave  him  great                 
  pleasure, and he saw advantages to moose  farming other than                 
  economical.                                                                  
                                                                               
  In answer to  Senator Kelly, Mr.  Welton said he would  keep                 
  his   butchering   operation  separate   from   the  tourist                 
  attraction.  Mr. Welton said he would keep all the cows, but                 
  relocate any that he was unable to financially or physically                 
  care for.   He said bulls  would be butchered  at around  18                 
  months.  His  experience showed that hand  raised moose were                 
  able to be  bred at 18 months  rather than three years.   He                 
  said he would  raise some of the  moose as pets and  some as                 
  livestock.                                                                   
                                                                               
  Co-chair Frank directed attention to amendment  #1 for SB 46                 
  which changed the language on  page 5, line 18 and  19, that                 
  said "on  the same  facility" to  read "in  the same  fenced                 
  area."  Co-chair  Frank then MOVED for adoption of amendment                 
  ADOPTED  for   incorporation  within  a   Finance  Committee                 
  Substitute for SB 46.                                                        
                                                                               
  Senator Sharp directed  attention to amendment #2  for SB 46                 
  on page 3, which said that the moose farm would provide safe                 
  facilities  for  the  veterinarian  and   the  animals  when                 
  required  inspections were  performed.   Senator  Sharp then                 
  MOVED for  adoption of  amendment #2.   No objection  having                 
  been  raised, the  amendment was  ADOPTED for  incorporation                 
  within a Finance Committee Substitute for SB 46.                             
                                                                               
  Co-Chair  Pearce  asked if  Senator  Miller's intent  was to                 
  define the word  "surplus."   Ms. Sager-Stancliff said  that                 
  Senator Miller had considered an amendment addressing orphan                 
  moose.  Discussion followed between Senator Kerttula and Ms.                 
  Sager-Stancliff regarding orphan moose,  and if orphan moose                 
  could be  considered "surplus."   Co-chair Pearce  announced                 
  that CSSB 46(FIN) would be held in committee and heard again                 
  on Wednesday, March 3, 1993.                                                 
                                                                               
                                                                               
  SENATE BILL NO. 49:                                                          
                                                                               
       An  Act relating  to preelection  reports; closing  the                 
                                                                               
                                                                               
       two-day  reporting gap  in those  reports;  setting the                 
       date  of  February  15  for  filing  year-end  campaign                 
       finance  reports;  and   requiring  reporting  of  zero                 
       year-end reports.                                                       
                                                                               
  Co-chair Pearce invited Senator Kelly,  sponsor of SB 49, to                 
  speak to the bill.  He said the major provisions of the bill                 
  would close a two day loophole, and make some changes to the                 
  campaign reporting laws.   JOSH FINK, aid to  Senator Kelly,                 
  said that SB 49 would change  the deadline for the year  end                 
  reports from  December 31 to  February 15.   Currently, APOC                 
  does accept reports by January 15 but  February 15 is a more                 
  practical date.   The  scope of  the year  end report  would                 
  change making  it easier  to read  and  understand, and  the                 
  filing of zero year end reports would become mandatory.  Mr.                 
  Fink explained that  APOC then could  monitor the filing  of                 
  those reports and levy fines on those who do not file.                       
                                                                               
  BROOKE   MILES,   Administrator,   Alaska   Public   Offices                 
  Commission (APOC),  Department of  Administration, spoke  in                 
  support  of  SB 49.   She  said  the bill  accomplishes some                 
  housekeeping that  APOC has  supported for  the last  twelve                 
  years.    She  said that  closing  the  two-day  gap in  the                 
  reporting   period  was   very  important   because  24-hour                 
  reporting   is  required   when   a  candidate   receives  a                 
  contribution over $250.  Because of  the existing gap of two                 
  days, candidates  can now  receive  contributions over  $250                 
  during the two days, and the public is not aware of it until                 
  after the election.                                                          
                                                                               
  Senator Kelly MOVED for passage of SB 49 from committee with                 
  accompanying  fiscal  notes.    No  objections  having  been                 
  raised, SB  49 was  REPORTED OUT  of committee  with a  zero                 
  fiscal note  for the  Department  of Administration,  Alaska                 
  Public  Offices  Commission.   Co-chairs  Pearce  and Frank,                 
  Senators  Kelly and Sharp signed the committee report with a                 
  "do pass"  recommendation.   Senator Kerttula  signed a  "no                 
  recommendation."  Senators Jacko and  Rieger were absent and                 
  did not sign.                                                                
                                                                               
  ADJOURNMENT                                                                  
                                                                               
  The meeting was adjourned at approximately 10:30 a.m.                        
                                                                               

Document Name Date/Time Subjects